Posted on July 15, 2015 by David Anderson

Team Kanban Practitioner

Lean Kanban University is introducing a new entry level Kanban class for Team Kanban together with a certification and professional credential, TKP, Team Kanban Practitioner. This new class becomes the entry level on the "alternative path to agility" and reflects the market reality that most Kanban starts shallow and at the team level.

Posted on July 15, 2015 by David Anderson

Kanban - the alternative path to agility

The Kanban Method was conceived as an alternative path to agility - as a means to improve responsiveness and adaptability without any significant revolution or reorganization in your way or working or political structure of your business. Lean Kanban University has recently introduced a series of training classes developed and evolved from older, tried and tested curriculum to ease adoption of Kanban and communicate the full scope and scale of what is possible when you fully embrace Kanban as a way to manage your modern professional services business.

Posted on October 28, 2014 by David Anderson

The Tyranny of the Ever Decreasing Timebox

Agile software development methods, with the exception of Feature-Driven Development, adopt the use of fixed time increments, often wrongly called “iterations”. In Scrum, these are known as Sprints. A Sprint is a fixed period of time with a defined scope and a commitment to complete that scope within that time window. Originally, Scrum defined 4 week sprints. This was changed later, circa 2004, to a recommendation for 2 weeks to be the default length for a sprint. In general it is recognized that agility is related to the frequency of interaction with the customers or business owners, and the frequency of deliveries. Hence, smaller timeboxes are more desirable. Software quality is often related to batch size and time to complete work in a non-linear fashion, hence, smaller batches, completed in short periods of time leads to dramatically fewer defects.

As a result of all these advantages, organizations adopting Agile software development methods, have been under pressure to adopt the use of shorter and shorter timeboxes for their sprints or iterations. On the face of it, smaller timeboxes and hence smaller batch sizes for the sprint backlog, are a good thing. However, smaller timeboxes create two types of pressure that are often difficult to cope with and adjust to: firstly, smaller batches require an ever more detailed approach to requirements analysis and development – the need to write every more fine-grained stories which can be completed within the smaller time window; and the need for an ever more accurate approach to estimation, so that a realistic commitment can made.

Posted on October 17, 2014 by David Anderson

Kanban Litmus Test - Revisited

The Kanban Litmus Test is our new guidance to help you assess "are we doing Kanban or not?" and to evaluate whether other who claim to be doing have actually reached a stage that would reflect the sort of impact that we saw in early implementations almost a decade ago.

Posted on October 17, 2014 by David Anderson

Enterprise Kanban: Where to Start?

For a corporation setting out on a large scale Kanban implementation, there is the inevitable question of, where to start? Typically, clients want to run a pilot on a single service delivery workflow but which one to choose? Firstly, we must find a service delivery workflow that is appropriate for a kanban system. [See the first post in this series on appropriateness of kanban systems]. To do this, we might view the organization through The Kanban Lens in order to identify suitable services. Secondly, we must assess whether this service is a good choice for a place to start Kanban.

Posted on October 17, 2014 by David Anderson

Kanban: When is it appropriate? (part 1)

In the Kanban Coaching Professional Masterclass, I teach coaches and those leading Kanban initiatives how to assess the appropriateness of the Kanban Method and the appropriateness of applying a kanban system within an organization. This is the first of a series of blog posts on appropriateness and getting started with an enterprise scale Kanban initiative.

Posted on September 20, 2014 by David Anderson

Recommendations for Kanban Coaching Professional Masterclass

Recent attendees of the Masterclass tell you what they valued and why you should attend...

David's approach to training is truly unique. I now have a different lens to view my team's upstream work, current work in progress, and deeper knowledge on how to communicate risk without disrupting the flow of changes throughout the organization.  What David has created with his, Modern Management Framework, is a revolutionary way of thinking for an evolutionary way of change. Jay Paulson

 

 
Posted on August 30, 2014 by David Anderson

Sneak Peak at Modern Management Framework

In China, "Kanban" simply means "looking at the board." For a Chinese audience, Kanban is encapsulated in the cartoon on the cover of my Kanban: Successful Evolutionary Change for your Technology Business. They don't need to look further than the characters standing in front of the board. Hence, to a Chinese mind, our management approach is centered around a standup meeting. All well and good and why not?

However, a senior executive at one of our clilents felt that this perception was likely to undermine the true value and the potential impact of our teachings on his business. So he suggested that we give the wider collection of ideas, intellectual property and teaching tools, a different name. It so happens I'd been thinking along similar lines and introducing terms and branding in our business to lay the foundation for this. So here it is, "The Modern Management Framework." This isn't new. It's the collection of our existing class curriculum and consulting tools but presented altogether in one place for the first time and under one banner.

Posted on August 08, 2014 by David Anderson

Project Management with Kanban (Part 3) - Forecasting

In part 3 of our look at Project Management with Kanban, we consider project planning using probabilistic forecasting. Kanban originally shocked the Agile community in 2008 as it became known for not using several practices agilists hold dear: no time-boxed iterations; no prioritization; and perhaps most shocking of all, no estimation!!! So how do you plan a project with a method that doesn't use estimates? The answer is that you use historical data or a model of expected capability to build a probabilistic forecast of the project outcome. What follows is a short discussion of one simple and common model for forecasting a project dellivery schedule...

Posted on August 04, 2014 by David Anderson

Project Management with Kanban (Part 2) - Sequencing Policies

In this second in my series of posts exploring project management with Kanban, I'd like to look at how we build a project schedule.

We prefer not to use the term "prioritization" with Kanban because prioritization isn't something done once or periodically leading to a prioritized list, instead prioritization is done dynamically each time an item is pulled through our kanban system. Prioritization isn't an activity in Kanban, it is a consequence of decisions made dynamically based on the risk profile of available work when a pull signal is generated in the kanban system.