Posted on September 20, 2014 by David Anderson

Recommendations for Kanban Coaching Professional Masterclass

Recent attendees of the Masterclass tell you what they valued and why you should attend...

David's approach to training is truly unique. I now have a different lens to view my team's upstream work, current work in progress, and deeper knowledge on how to communicate risk without disrupting the flow of changes throughout the organization.  What David has created with his, Modern Management Framework, is a revolutionary way of thinking for an evolutionary way of change. Jay Paulson

 

Posted on September 05, 2014 by David Anderson

Kanban Coaching Professional Masterclass Curriculum

For the first time, I'm posting our curriculum for the Kanban Coaching Professional Masterclass. This new curriculum is scoped within the Modern Management Framework and takes effect in Masterclasses offered after November 1st 2014.

Posted on September 04, 2014 by David Anderson

LeanKanban Kanban Foundation Curriculum

As part of our continuing sneak peak of the new LeanKanban Modern Management Framework, I want to show how we are using it to define and communicate the curriculum for individual training classes. We are now offering a wide range of training classes at different levels. Here we look at the 2-day Kanban Foundation level training...

Posted on August 31, 2014 by David Anderson

Learning about Risk & WIP from Real Life

I find that real life examples can help people understand why you can't talk about kanban systems without talking about risk, and why you can't calculate WIP limits without understanding work item types, risk and classes of service. Consider the humble problem of "how many shirts do you need hanging in your closet?"...

 
Posted on August 30, 2014 by David Anderson

Sneak Peak at Modern Management Framework

In China, "Kanban" simply means "looking at the board." For a Chinese audience, Kanban is encapsulated in the cartoon on the cover of my Kanban: Successful Evolutionary Change for your Technology Business. They don't need to look further than the characters standing in front of the board. Hence, to a Chinese mind, our management approach is centered around a standup meeting. All well and good and why not?

However, a senior executive at one of our clilents felt that this perception was likely to undermine the true value and the potential impact of our teachings on his business. So he suggested that we give the wider collection of ideas, intellectual property and teaching tools, a different name. It so happens I'd been thinking along similar lines and introducing terms and branding in our business to lay the foundation for this. So here it is, "The Modern Management Framework." This isn't new. It's the collection of our existing class curriculum and consulting tools but presented altogether in one place for the first time and under one banner.

Posted on July 21, 2014 by David Anderson

The Value of the KCP Masterclass

I've listed a whole series of Kanban Coaching Professional (KCP) Masterclasses for the 2nd half of 2012. These classes are typically residential and can be consumed as 2 x 3-days or in a single 5-day week long intensive class. Typically 4 out of 5 people are choosing the 5-day version of the class since we introduced it at the beginning of 2014. These classes are a big commitment in time and money and we often get asked where the value is? I'd like  to explain.

Posted on July 21, 2014 by David Anderson

A Brief History of Kanban for Knowledge Work

Success has many fathers! Recently, there has been some content published elsewhere on the web that seeks to re-write the history of the adaptation of kanban systems into the field of creative knowledge work. The individuals publishing these alternative versions of history are generally doing it for self-serving reasons or in some cases as deliberate misinformation to try and undermine my business. To put the record straight, I've compiled this definitive history...

A History of Kanban for Creative Knowledge Work

October 2004

Dragos Dumitriu, manager XIT Sustaining Engineering at Microsoft, asks me to help him. I design a pull system for Dragos' group and coach him on how to introduce it. He "sells' the idea to his bosses and his 4 product managers who act as his customers. The pull system was implemented on Microsoft Product Studio (a forerunner of Team Foundation Server). There was no physical board. The engineering team was offshore in Hyderabad, India. The system implemented was inspired by Theory of Constraints Drum-Buffer-Rope and worked on the assumption that Test was the bottleneck.